Flight
Flying altitudes of different aircrafts

Flying altitudes of different aircrafts

Over 40 thousand planes take flight every day in the United States, with more than 5 thousand of them flying at once. The FAA puts in lots of effort in coordinating that many flight departures and arrivals without collisions with well-crafted master strategies. The altitude in which planes fly is determined by several factors, like the aircraft’s weight, its destination, fluency of travel. High altitudes have thinner air supporting a more fluent trip, but some heights are dangerous to travel in. Engines of aircraft, strength of winds, or weather conditions that day determine how high an aircraft should travel to maintain balance and safety of travels.

Planes are mostly observed to cruise

Planes are mostly observed to cruise just above clouds, this is because the air above these clouds is thinner than those below, which makes them fly faster. Aviation analysts tell us that thinner air proffers lesser resistance to a plane’s motion, enabling it to fly more efficiently. When a big plane takes off from the air tracks at airports, the immediate aim of pilots is to get as high as possible in little time to sustain flight balance. They travel as high as 35,000 feet which are rounded off to about 7 miles from mother Earth to their cruising altitude in a little over or less than ten minutes. Flying above this height is no problem for aircraft, but safety measures prevent pilots from going up further, in order not to endanger passengers lives on board.

Flying altitudes of different aircrafts

When planes fly higher than this, it requires a lengthened time to revert to a safer altitude in cases of atmospheric turbulence. It’s also wise to stay within its cruising zone to conserve fuel for the journey as going higher will lead to spending more fuel than it requires. Plane’s weight prevents them from traveling higher they’ll want to, the heavier they weigh the harder it becomes to flyer higher. Wind’s direction is a factor worth considering, consider a flight going from Philadelphia to France, the wind is causing much resistance than if it’s going the opposite direction. Higher altitudes are attained when the wind is pushing an aircraft from behind, leading to faster travels.

As it goes high, the speed of aircraft increases, in ten thousand feet, a pilot can travel at a faster pace to hasten trips. But small jets do not fly at these heights because they are manufactured with a piston-powered engine preventing them from flying that high. They tend to stay below the 15 thousand feet mark, they’re often prone to health risks like hypoxia at greater heights. Unlike commercial planes that have oxygen tanks supplying passengers with oxygen, smaller jets don’t, that’s why travel low. Choppers are made to fly short distances and so will fly at an even lower height compared to airplanes, unable to ascend a plane’s height as they lack wings.